Writing therapy notes may not be the best part of a clinician’s day, but it is a vital part of running an organized, efficient practice. Many mental healthcare providers find that between seeing patients and maintaining an office, they often fall behind in their notes, finding it difficult to play catch-up, as well as document new cases and provide current session notes.

However, technology is quickly becoming the new best friend of therapists everywhere, providing clinicians with fast, easy approaches to tackle that growing pile of therapy notes. Let’s take a look at three ways to increase documentation productivity!

 

1. Take Notes Electronically

The best way to speed up your note taking is to do it electronically. Not only does it save time to use software products for electronic notes, but it creates much more concise notes, also making it easy to retrieve notes with a simple click. Electronic therapy notes may also assist with generalized office coordination, making it easy to generate reports and analyze the information.

2. Try Collaborative Documentation

Wouldn’t it be great to have a good portion of your notes written before the patient even leaves the office? Therapists utilizing a method known as collaborative documentation are making this a reality! Collaborative documentation is basically involving the client in the note-taking process, offering up a series of questions for the patient and allowing them the time to respond, while all the time easily providing electronic documentation. Not only are you writing a good portion of your notes during the therapy session, but you are also boosting patient engagement in their treatment.

3. Stop Procrastinating

Make it a point to finish up your notes for the day that you are not able to complete during sessions before you even leave the office. Creating documentation when the session is still fresh in your mind will make writing notes go by much faster. Flipping through patient files and analyzing notes for a second time to be sure of the details are sure ways to slow down the process. However, if you do find that you need to access your notes, taking those notes electronically provides an easy method for fast retrieval.
When clinicians can spend less time writing their therapy notes, it can open up more time to spend seeing clients, bringing in more money for the practice and providing beneficial mental healthcare for people who really need it. Taking notes electronically should have you well on your way to making a pile of notes on your desk a thing of the past.

No matter how successful you may be, I think that every private practice could stand a little more cash flow. Someone once said “It takes money to make money”.  And this couldn’t be any more prolific than in the mental healthcare industry, where every dollar earned seems to disappear beneath a pile of bills and overhead costs.

However, some pretty ingenious folks have come up with a few ways to spend a little less and make a whole lot more. So, let’s take a look at how you can increase your practice’s revenue while saving money, leading to a more efficient environment with a continued effort to provide beneficial services to your patients.

 

1. Ditch the Paper

Many practices just don’t realize how much money they waste every year on paper, especially when there are so many products available these days to make the transition to going paperless completely seamless. Get an EHR in place, and have patients complete screenings and surveys via an electronic platform. Not only will these simple changes help the environment and save a bit of money, but your patients will welcome the easy-to-use, time-saving technology!

 

2. Look Over Your Vendor Contracts

Many practices have dealt with the same vendors for years, and they may not even be aware if their contracts are competitive with the current market. Over time, prices generally do go up, but occasionally certain industries may experience a drop in pricing. Always be sure to keep your ear to the ground and know when it may be time to double-check the details with your vendors. Plus, if you receive more than one service or product from a particular company, check on multiple-order discounts, just in case you can save a few extra dollars. Over the course of a year, it all adds up!

 

3. Put a Cancellation Policy in Place

Practices lose thousands of dollars every year to cancellations and no-shows. In fact, some studies have even shown that up to 30% of patients miss or fail to show for their mental healthcare appointments.  So, set a reasonable fee for no-shows and appointments that are cancelled at the last minute, and let’s just see if your patients “remember” their appointments with a bit more regularity. Not only do missed appointments cost a practice money, but there’s an empty slot that could have been filled with a patient that truly needed help.

 

4. Establish a Strong Social Media Presence

These days, social media is about a lot more than changing your Facebook status when you get a new kitten. Using social media to your advantage is just plain smart, because it’s essentially FREE advertising. Who can say “no” to that? Making frequent updates and sharing new posts and blogs are all good ways to draw attention to your practice, all the while establishing a strong connection with your patients, potential patients and the entire community. Imagine the revenue earned from just one new patient, attracted by advertising that didn’t cost you a penny!

 

5. Try to Add One More Patient to Each Office Day

The obvious way to increase your revenue is to see more patients in a day. Think about the extra money that your practice would have if you could fit in just one more patient every day. To achieve this, you must really stay on top of your calendar, and the best way to do this is to use intuitive scheduling software. When you can see your week or month at a glance, it’s easier to become aware of gaps in your schedule, allowing you to potentially see one more patient. This also provides one more opportunity to connect with an individual in need of mental healthcare. It’s truly a win-win!

Everyone is talking about going paperless these days, causing therapists everywhere to wonder just what are the benefits to taking this technological leap. While obviously helping the environment is at the top of the list, there are a host of other reasons why you should rid your practice of stacks of paper and confusing files of clutter. Let’s take a look at the top three!

1. Cutting Down Time in Taking Notes

To start, an aspect where all mental healthcare would love to save a bit of time is in taking notes. While many therapists still keep that pad and pen handy at all times, using a tablet and simple note-taking software can go a long way in the effort to go paperless. This not only makes the practice of note-taking much more efficient, but it offers organizational benefits that could literally save you so much time that you might even be able to squeeze in an extra patient. With benefits like this, taking notes electronically should be the obvious next step to providing better private practice productivity.

2. You Can Save Time and Administration Efforts for Patient Screenings

Before going paperless, most patient screenings and questionnaires are conducted via a clipboard and a stack of photocopied paper, which are distributed by an employee upon check-in. Patients then hurriedly check boxes and scribble in answers, hoping to finish before their names are called. However, going paperless means that therapists can opt for a system offering online screening instruments, saving the practice both time AND money. Patients would also be able to access screenings from their smartphones, tablets or computers, keeping them better engaged in their therapy between office visits.

3. Your Files Are Safer and Easily Accessible

Finally, one of the most important benefits of going paperless in your private practice is that a leading HIPAA compliant software will keep your files safe, as well as provide much easier access. While most offices do take the necessary steps to backup important files, the point still remains that vital paperwork could be still be lost or even damaged. And when therapists choose to go paperless, they may also access their files from any place and at any time. With the technology that is available today, it just doesn’t make sense to employ college students to file paperwork and flip through clunky folders searching for elusive data.

 

Now that you know WHY you should go paperless, check out our post on HOW you can do it!

5 Easy Steps to Having a Paperless Private Practice

It seems that everyone is going paperless these days, and for good reason! Not only does not using paper help the environment and save your practice money, but there are plenty of other reasons that you should ditch the paper.

Reducing your use of paper will clear up a lot of clutter around the office, and dependent upon the types of programs and software that you choose to incorporate, you will be able to access your files and documents from home or even when you’re on vacation. Also, you won’t need to worry about your files being damaged, lost or even stolen, because everything will be digitally stored, free from the fear of spilled coffee, a new employee who files documents in the wrong place or a box that is lost during a move. Going paperless is definitely the way to go, leading to reaping the benefits of higher efficiency within your private practice. So, let’s explore a handful of ways to rid your office of stacks of paper and cluttered file cabinets!

1. Implement an EHR

The biggest step that a practice can take toward going paperless is to get started with an electronic health records software. And not only will an EHR cut back on the use of paper around the office, but it will organize your practice, as well, incorporating note taking, scheduling, a calendar and billing. Some software may also offer the options for the availability of digital patient consent forms and insurance filing. If the software also offers patient reminders, then that is even a bigger plus. Get ready to say goodbye to those cancellations and no-shows!

2. Sign up for Online Faxing

Another step to ensuring that your practice only uses paper when absolutely necessary is to register for an Internet-based fax program. Have you ever had one of those faxes that keeps receiving and printing dozens of pages, when you really only needed the last sheet? Cut back on paper by using online faxing to digitally store your incoming faxes, making it possible to only print when needed. This also keeps your faxes organized, typically available for sorting by date or category, and you will be able to easily access this information whenever it is needed.

3. Utilize Online Tools for Patient Screenings

Private practices can use a lot of paper for screening for mental health conditions. With every visit, patients also continue to fill out numerous forms, including health questionnaires to assist with monitoring their treatments. Incorporating online instruments for mental healthcare will not only rid your office of unnecessary paperwork, but it will organize these important documents, making them readily available for additional study and review. This type of software will also cut back on time spent by office staff administering these screenings and surveys, as that patients may access them from their own smartphones and tablets.

4. Purchase a Good Scanner

Once you begin storing all or most of your files digitally, you will want to keep up the practice by scanning in any documents that you receive in paper form. Scanning your documents will make them readily available digitally, along with the rest of your other files, so that all of a patient’s information can reside in one secure location. So, be sure to shop around and find a sheet-fed scanner, capable of scanning individual or multiple pages at a time. Once you have determined your daily scanner usage, look for a machine that will fit your budget, as well as work at a speed that will not hinder your workflow.

5. Start a Recycling Program

Now, while the idea of going paperless is wonderful, we all know that it is pretty much impossible to cut out all use of paper in an office, especially depending on each practice’s individual needs. However, even when using paper is necessary, setting up a system for recycling will help offset this occasional usage. The biggest part of beginning to recycle is to make sure that the entire office is on board. Once everyone adjusts to the minor changes it will entail, then consistently shredding and recycling will become habit, pushing your private practice just one step closer to becoming as paperless as possible.

Welcome to the third part in Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing on trauma. These tools can be beneficial in a number of different ways, but most importantly can assist with keeping patients more engaged throughout the course of their treatments. Clinicians will also appreciate that these instruments can assist in running a more efficient practice, replacing paperwork, saving valuable time and putting in a place a better way to administer screenings and assessments. Another great thing about these online tools is that they can generate additional income, offering an opportunity for additional billing for each patient.

This post will focus on information sheets that are helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from trauma. Mentegram provides an innovative opportunity for mental healthcare providers to make selections from a variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to more detailed, survey-style screenings and assessments. They may then assign these tools to individual patients, with scheduled reminders set by the therapist to provide information or read information sheets that will assist with their therapy

And the really fun part is that these instruments can be conveniently downloaded to each patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, where they can have access from the comfort of their homes, in the waiting room or in any other setting that they choose. Patients will have numerous ways to supply their clinicians with much-needed information, as well as continue to stay better involved with their own courses of treatment.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Information Sheet)

This information sheet provides simplified illustrations and detailed examples for ten unhealthy thought patterns. These thinking styles include all or nothing thinking, over-generalising, assigning mental filters, disqualifying the positive, jumping to conclusions, magnification, emotional reasoning, using critical words, labeling and personalisation.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Thought Suppression And Intrusive Thoughts (Information Sheet)

This helpful information sheet thoroughly explains the related issues to thought suppression, explaining that the harder one tries not to think of something, the more it will remain a constant trigger to one’s thoughts. This sheet illustrates this through a simply, easy-to-complete exercise.

DEPRESSION Thought Supression Intriguing Thoughts

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What Is Rumination? (Information Sheet)

Rumination, also known as repetitive thought, is a transdiagnostic maintenance process that offers explanations for a wide variety of mental healthcare conditions. This CBT information sheet explores a myriad of different thinking styles, along with the consequences of such thoughts and their psychological effects.

What Is Rumination

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What If .. ? (Exercise)

This worksheet provides an exercise that assists in exploring multiple scenarios involved with situations and events. It provides the patient the opportunity to visual circumstances in different lights, prompting them to investigate their feelings and emotions in regards to these resulting consequences.

What if

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

And how can these helpful exercises and information sheets assist YOUR patients? That’s easy to find out! Simply try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from trauma, or any other mental health condition. You may explore Mentegram’s entire library of instruments, and begin seeing a higher percentage of patient engagement and better over-all efficiency within YOUR practice!

Plus, Mentegram’s library of online tools can assist with symptoms associated with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Feel free to check out other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

 

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part One

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part Two

 

Welcome once again to the next installment of Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing primarily on trauma. These instruments can be key in leading to mental health providers running more efficient practices, along with generating additional revenue. Replacing paperwork and formatted surveys with online digital tools will even prove to save a lot of time in administration, also providing a systematic way to remotely stay in touch with a patient’s overall needs. To reach these goals, Mentegram offers a variety of online tools, ranging from simple sliding scales to slightly more detailed emotional and behavioral screenings and assessments.

This post will focus on therapy approaches that clinicians may assign to patients who are suffering from trauma. Individually selected for each particular patient, these tools, right at the patient’s fingertips, will assist with their treatment by providing pertinent information to their therapist or physician. And the best part is that these instruments can be easily downloaded to the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, along with scheduled reminders that can be easily set by the therapist. These scheduled instruments will not only provide a convenient way to bridge the gap between office visits, but it will create better patient engagement across the board.

 

What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR)? (Information Sheet)

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is a treatment for processing distressing, traumatic memories and situational circumstances. EMDR can assist in properly storing sensitive memories so that they can be processed in a helpful way. Bilateral stimulation is utilized along with eye movements to enhance memory processing.

What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)? (Information Sheet)

This highly detailed information sheet explains and provides illustrations for trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy. Often differentiating between different types of trauma-based issues can be difficult, so this online tools simplifies this, along with outlining the typical treatment for TF-CBT. It explains the importance of being grounded and stable, along with learning to process memories and understand beliefs.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

DBT Diary Card

The DBT Diary Card is a simple, sliding scale evaluation that provides patients with a way to track their daily emotions. Patients may address feelings of anger, sadness, anxiety and happiness, as well as chronicle situations or circumstances that were difficult to process. It also allows patients to track skills that they are attempting to manage.

DBT Diary Card

 

DBT Diary Card Protocol

The DBT Diary Card Protocol is an online tool that encompasses three instruments, including diary cards to be utilized for daily records, skills used and weekly check-ins.

The Diary Card – Daily Record offers a series of questions, as well as simple “yes” and “no” choices, for better understanding emotions and behaviors. These queries include topics involving self harm, self acceptance, compassion, anger, joy, shame, sadness and fear.

The Diary Card – Skills Used provides multiple choice answers to correspond with questions associated with core mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotional regulation, distress tolerance and other daily skills. Questions may be addressed with scenarios involved with varying degrees of effective skill utilization.

The Diary Card – Weekly Check-in chronicles the patient’s response to their own therapy, and how their feelings and emotions are corresponding to their treatment. Through a series of questions, patients may address their need for consultations, any urges to stop treatment, weekly agendas and the review of weekly notes.

Diary Card - Weekly Check-In

 

By now, you must be really interested to see how these online tools can help YOUR patients with trauma-related conditions, so be sure to try out the instruments. You may also fully explore the variety of instruments that Mentegram has to offer. Why not begin ushering in a higher level of efficiency, as well as better patient engagement into YOUR practice today?

Plus, Mentegram’s library of online tools can assist with symptoms associated with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Feel free to check out other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part One

 

Welcome to the first portion of Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing on trauma. These tools not only can keep patients more engaged throughout the course of their treatments, but they can be key in assisting mental health providers in running more efficient practices, even generating additional revenue. Replacing paperwork with digital tools will even save valuable time in administering screenings and assessments, also providing an opportunity to more thoroughly keep in tune with each patient’s progression and overall needs. To achieve those goals, Mentegram offers providers an innovative opportunity to make selections from a variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to more detailed, survey-style screenings and assessments.

This post will focus on information sheets that are helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from trauma, especially those connected with additional symptoms of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). These instruments may be hand selected by the clinician for each individual patient, assisting with their treatment by utilizing the easy-to-use, beneficial tools right at the patient’s fingertips. And the really cool part is that these instruments can be conveniently downloaded on their smart phones, tablets or computers, with scheduled reminders set by the therapist to provide information and complete surveys or questionnaires to assist with their therapy.

Patients will have numerous aids, capable of documenting their symptoms, thoughts and feelings associated with trauma, along with PTSD. Let’s take a look at a few information sheets, designed specifically for trauma associated with PTSD.

 

PTSD and Memory

This information sheet to assist with trauma and PTSD is also an easy-to-uderstand guide explaining the primary parts of the brain that are typically associated with PTSD. By having a better understanding of the amygdala, hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex, patients may find it less difficult to understand exactly why and how PTSD occurs.

PTSD and Memory

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

This information sheet for symptoms associated with PTSD is presented in the form of a metaphor, focusing primarily on how patients who are suffering from PTSD often find themselves in scenarios where they seem to act out the same situations over and over again in their minds. When a patient suffering from PTSD undergoes treatment, often reliving these memories in a safe, controlled environment can prove to be a very effective form of therapy. This information sheet can assist patients with learning to properly process these memories.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Linen Cupboard Metaphor

This information sheet contains an illustrated metaphor that offers an easy-to-understand explanation of treatments for patients suffering from PTSD. The explanation is extremely simple, showing how patients may “unpack” a problem, and fold it and “repack” it in a way to where it will create less problematic scenarios for the patient. When everything doesn’t go perfectly as planned, this information sheet also shows how to deal with situations that tend to “fall” out of the cupboard.

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Surely you must be interested to see how these information sheets can assist YOUR patients, so act now and try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from PTSD. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, along with welcoming higher efficiency and a better level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Also keep in mind that Mentegram’s library of instruments can assist with the symptoms related to depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Read other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part Two

 

Changes to healthcare and its billing system occur quite frequently, often creating huge obstacles for primary healthcare providers. And let’s just face it. The way things were done ten years ago is very different from the accepted policies of today, and not everyone is always ready to jump aboard.

So, when a new change comes through the pipes, creating new opportunities and even generating more revenue, primary healthcare providers should take note. They should immediately begin utilizing any new billing methods, ensuring their involvement in anything that even faintly resembles a step in the right direction.

For example, CPT Code 96127, introduced back in January of 2015, may be billed for emotional and mental health assessments, enabling primary care physicians to conduct screenings that can generate up to $24 per patient. But this exciting new standard is not just about billing. In fact, the estimation of its reach is nearly immeasurable. And it’s exciting, to say the least!

Just imagine that patients who come into the office for an appointment may be screened via an iPad in the waiting room, or they may even engage in assessments BEFORE the office visit even occurs, using downloadable applications and online screening tools. The findings of these assessments can then sent to the physician, who will have the opportunity to even remotely check on the mental health of the patient, whenever he has the time available to do so.

Not only will this provide the convenience of “getting to the root of the problem” via the use of digital instruments, but it may also alert a physician to underlying situations that could be triggering physical conditions, therefore actually cutting down on the time spent on the diagnosis. As that numerous health conditions may be caused by mental or emotional trauma, this will even lead to more accurate forms of treatment.

And the good news is that not only will these screenings and assessments save time with the diagnosis, but they can further streamline the PCP’s practice. For example, patients will not need to fill out lengthy surveys when they have an office visit, and administrative personnel will not need to spend valuable time distributing these surveys. Even going a step further, physicians will not need to use time that could be spent with a patient assessing the findings of the screenings and applying the results. Instead, patients will be able to participate in screenings and assessments via their own smartphones and tablets, whether in the office or in the comfort of their own homes. Really… how cool is THAT?

And when the relationship between a patient and a physician is put under the spotlight, one of the most important factors at play is whether or not the patient will stay engaged throughout the course of their treatment, allowing for a much higher rate for a positive outcome. Chances are that some patients have never sought help from a mental healthcare professional, and experiencing an assessment for the first time from a trusted physician will definitely open the door to further care from a therapist, should it be needed.

When searching for the best way to screen and assess patients for emotional or mental healthcare needs, primary care physicians should be sure to provide an easy-to-use platform, encouraging patients to continue to work with their primary care physicians to regulate their mental healthcare needs. Mentegram has a library full of instruments that may be used to detect signs of anxiety, depression, and PTSD… just to name a few.

The PHQ-9 is a wonderful example of a screening that can be utilized to find existing mental health conditions in patients. Utilizing a simplistic sliding scale, patients may weigh in on the emotions that they have been experiencing, including losing interest in daily activities and feeling down or depressed, along with trouble staying awake, falling asleep or even sleeping too much.

DEPRESSION PHQ-9

You may also find more detailed information regarding the new code and screenings at How to Increase Revenue with the NEW Behavioral or Emotional Assessment CPT Code 96127 or 3 Online Screenings That Can Be Billed With CPT Code 96127.
If you are interested in how these instruments could be beneficial for your practice, please feel free to check out Mentegram, and begin screening and assessing patients today!

Although it has only been around since January of last year, CPT Code 96127 has been attracting a lot of attention as of late. Some clinicians are just now finding out that CPT Code 96127 may be used to report brief behavioral or emotional assessments for reimbursement. And what does this mean for mental healthcare providers? It means more generated revenue from each patient that walks through the door!

It can be a bit tricky how exactly to bill for CPT Code 96127, and then how and by whom it will be reimbursed. Enough inquiries have arisen that we decided to create a guide answering all of the tough questions that this new billing code has brought to light. Please feel free to check out “How to Increase Revenue with the NEW Behavioral or Emotional Assessment CPT Code 96127”.

However, a lot of clinicians are wondering just what types of screenings and assessments can be billed under CPT Code 96127. It’s also good to know just how these particular tools function, and which disorders they may be used to evaluate.

Mentegram’s library of online instruments is vast and thorough, boasting surveys, sliding scale evaluations, questionnaires, daily journals and information sheets… just to name a few. Let’s take a brief look at the most popular tools that can have you assessing patients who are at risk of mental illness, as well as generating additional revenue, totaling up to $24 per patient for each visit.

Screening Instruments

Mentegram’s library includes an array of questionnaires to assess mental health conditions. Health questionnaires can serve as very informative tools that can provide very unique perspectives regarding the patient’s individual emotional and behavioral needs. By simply responding to a series of prompts, the patient may provide valuable information that will assist the healthcare provider with determining future treatments.

Public-domain instruments in the Mentegram library include PHQ-9, PHQ-A and GAD-7. We also can digitize licensed instruments, such as the DSM-5 screeners, DASS and much, much more.

The PHQ-9 is an excellent example of how screening instrument can be utilized for billing under CPT Code 96127. This instrument offers multiple choice questions that can help in assessing a patient’s reaction or lack of attention toward things in their regular life, such as daily activities, sleep patterns, lack of energy and overall appetite. The information provided may assist clinicians in deciding if treatment for a multitude of conditions is needed.

DEPRESSION PHQ-9

The good news about CPT Code 96127 is that the benefits associated with the use of these tools does not stop at generating revenue through billing. Utilizing these instruments can also:

  • Reduce and even replace paperwork
  • Save valuable time in administration by screening the patients digitally and monitoring their progression
  • Boost patient engagement
  • Create customized reminders for patients
  • Assist in scheduling with a built-in calendar

Also keep in mind that screenings, easily scheduled and even sent to the patient via the Mentegram application, can be administered the day before an office visit. This allows the clinician to have ample time to review the assessments before even seeing the patient.

If you are interested in learning more about the CPT code 96127 and how Mentegram can help you, continue here:

DISCLAIMER: Please keep in mind that Mentegram is a software company, and do not consider content on our website as legal advice. It is your responsibility to decide to act on this content, relinquishing Mentegram of all claims. The information that we share is either what has worked well for our customers or curated content of the best practices from authorities.
We don’t consider ourselves billing consultants and experts. If you aren’t sure, please consult the particular insurance company or billing consultant for additional information.

Welcome to our series describing Mentegram’s online tools for mental health. These instruments will help patients stay much better engaged with their treatments, as well as ensure that therapists can maintain a higher level of efficiency within their own practices. Mental healthcare providers can use these tools to help reduce and even replace paperwork, virtually saving time in administration by screening the patients and monitoring their progression, even in between appointments. To provide these optimal results, Mentegram supplies a library full of tools that range from detailed surveys to simple sliding scales

This post will focus on information sheets that may be assigned to patients suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) by their mental healthcare providers. These instruments may be conveniently accessed on the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, and therapists may even send reminders to their patients.

A variety of thought-provoking information sheets are available, exploring topics like thinking styles, rumination and suppression. They also provide positive affirmations that will assist with the patient’s symptoms of PTSD, as well as help therapists track a patient’s mental health between sessions.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

This information sheet illustrates a wonderful metaphor, focusing on how patients suffering from PTSD are often forced to replay the same scenarios over and over again in our minds. However, when undergoing treatment, reliving these memories can occur in a safe, controlled environment. This tool can assist patients with processing these memories.

  PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)?

This helpful information sheet describes trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy. It assists patients with differentiating between trauma-based issues and PTSD, as well as outlining the treatment for TF-CBT. It goes over grounding and stabilization, working with memories, working with beliefs and reclaiming one’s life.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

This illustrated metaphor explains the treatment to patients suffering from PTSD. This brilliant metaphor illustrates how patients may unpack a problem and then repack it in a way that creates less problematic issues for the patient. Problems may spontaneously “fall” out of the cupboard, but this sheet provides solutions for this occurrence.

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD and Memory

This information doubles as guide for understanding the different parts of the brain associated with PTSD. Patients suffering with PTSD may benefit greatly from comprehending the functions of the amygdala, hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex.

PTSD and Memory

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Other information sheets that are available for PTSD include: Thought Suppression and Intrusive Thoughts, Unhelpful Thinking Styles, What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR) and What is Rumination.

You must be eager by now to see how these information sheets can assist YOUR patients, so act now and try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from PTSD. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, along with welcoming higher efficiency and a better level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Also keep in mind that Mentegram’s library of instruments can assist with the symptoms related to depression, eating disorders, substance abuse and many other conditions. Read other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.