Welcome to Mentegram’s series focusing on our library of online tools for mental health, which assist providers with raising the levels of patient engagement and running more efficient practices.

What are the codes, who can bill for them and what are the differences between the two?

 

Both of these CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) Codes are part of a particular family of billing codes, including 99211-99215. They are part of HCPS, the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System. They are used for office visits with established patients being treated for medical and mental health conditions.

While these two codes are within the same family, they do have different regulations for reimbursement. Due to some of their similarities, many healthcare providers can experience confusion when deciding which one to bill.  The fact that one code provides for additional revenue/reimbursement makes it critically important to thoroughly understood the differences. This way, all clinicians billing with these codes can receive the highest reimbursement for their services.  This being said, providers must be sure that the treatment being offered accurately represents the services required for billing with such a code

Some providers bill with CPT Code 99214 all the time. Others are afraid that they won’t be reimbursed for it. Once you know the ins and outs of both codes, choosing which one to bill is actually quite simple. To avoid any pitfalls, let’s take a closer look at each code and how it can be used for reimbursement.

 

What exactly are CPT Codes 99213 and 99214?

CPT Code 99213 can be utilized for a mid-level outpatient or inpatient office visit. CPT Code 99213 is a level three code that should be used for an established patient. It cannot be used with a new patient who has no history. However, this code is extremely popular, being the second most used among middle level billing codes. This is due, in part, to more easily achieved factors for reimbursement on this code than with other CPT Codes, including 99214.

CPT Code 99214 can be used as part of the second highest level in care for a patient’s visit. CPT Code 99214 is a level four code that can be used only for an established patient, whether the visit is conducted in the office or in an outpatient atmosphere. Therefore, it is no surprise that CPT Code 99214 is used the most frequently for this form of visit. It offers higher revenue/reimbursement than some similar CPT codes, including CPT Code 99213. This has especially been the case since changes were made back in 2013,  along with the Affordable Care Act’s inclusion of mental healthcare in 2006.

 

Who can bill with CPT Codes 99213 and 99214?

Many medical professionals can bill with CPT Codes 99213 and 96214. The good news is that it is not only for mental health providers or therapists. Behavioral health assessments can be very important tools in the most common of healthcare environments. For example, they can be used in primary care or OB/GYN offices.

An easy-to-understand example of a physician using CPT Code 99213 is when an existing patient has a scheduled appointment for a routine health examination. This patient may have had mild back pain for three or four years, being treated with muscle relaxants. When the pain occurs, the patient may also experience anxiety, which is being treated with a low-dose anxiolytic medication. There are no new diagnosis or medications prescribed. However, behavioral assessment tools may be utilized to ensure that the anxiety is still at a mid-level, with no additional risk factors.

A great example of a primary care doctor using CPT Code 99214 is when an existing patient comes in for a routine health examination for chronic pain. However, the flow of conversation may quickly turn to feelings of depression that are now accompanying this pain. The physician may choose to prescribe a medication for the patient’s behavioral health ailment. In more severe cases, perhaps even a referral may be set in motion for a mental health professional. Standardized assessment tools for depression (e.g. PHQ-9) may also be used to gather more detailed information.

 

What procedures are there for billing CPT Code 99213?

Understanding the conditions that must be present for billing with CPT Code 99213 is pretty straightforward. There must be two out of three of the following components:

  • An expanded problem-focused history
  • An expanded problem-focused examination
  • Medical decision-making with low complexity

Any mix of these three components will enable a provider to bill with CPT Code 99213. However, there must be a sum of at least 15 minutes of face-to-face time with the patient. The problems are typically considered to be of low to moderate severity.

What procedures are there for billing CPT Code 99214?

This is actually the simplest part of billing with CPT Code 99214. There must be two out of three factors included for proper billing of Code 99214. These necessary components include:

  • A detailed interval history
  • A detailed examination
  • Medical decision-making that can be considered to be of moderate complexity

Any mixture of these components necessary to bill for CPT Code 99214 should be presented in face-to-face time with the patient, totaling 25 minutes. The problems are usually of a moderate to high complexity.

How Do You Meet These Components?

While the detailed or expanded exams are fairly commonplace, as well as easily achieved, most of the questions come in regarding the history and decision-making components. However, these may also be carried out and documented in far less complex methods than originally anticipated.

The detailed or expanded history can be simply derived from past charts of the existing patient. However, it can also be even more easily collected through assessments that are filled out in the waiting room. A good example of this is the utilization of mental health assessment tools to investigate the possibility of mental illness as a possible attributing factor to a health problem.

Also keep in mind that decision making does not always need to include detailed exams. It can most commonly be achieved when a consultation with a specialist (e.g. a psychologist or a psychiatrist) is required. With 99214 , it is possible when there has been a new diagnosis (e.g. depression or anxiety), requiring further testing or a new medication prescription.

 

How often can testing be billed with CPT Codes 99213 and 99214?

When it is discovered that a patient requires this low (CPT Code 99213) or moderate (CPT Code 99214) level of care during a visit, being able to bill for additional revenue is like a bonus, second to providing extended care for a patient in need. CPT Codes 99213 and 99214 may be billed in time-derived methods for each patient during each session where the guidelines for billing are met. Healthcare providers will be able to provide a higher level of care for their patients by discovering mental health issues. They will also be able to bill for these additional options.

 

How much are reimbursements for screenings billed using CPT Codes 99213 and 99214?

Billing with CPT Codes 99213 and 99214 are both based on face-to-face time during the visit. These visits will include any behavioral assessment tools that are utilized during the appointment. For example, a major national healthcare insurer’s policies include CPT Code 99213 being reimbursed for up to $72.70 for each patient. With the same insurer, CPT Code 99214 can be reimbursed for up to $107.20 for each patient.  That is a difference of nearly $35 per patient, which could mean a difference of literally hundreds of dollars each day or well over a thousand dollars each week.

 

Where can I find standardized screening instruments to use with CPT Codes 99213 or 99214 for behavioral assessments?

Mentegram has a library full of online tools, such as the PHQ-9, that range from detailed surveys to simple sliding scales. They can be used to increase the complexity of visits and thereby qualify for billing with a higher code (e.g. billing CPT Code 99214 instead of 99213). Mental healthcare providers may also use these tools to help reduce and even replace paperwork. This can save valuable time in patient intake and with screening the patients and monitoring their progression, even in between appointments.

 

What are the most important things to remember about differentiating between CPT Codes 99213 and 99214?

  1. Be sure to remember the difference in the components that must be present to bill for each code.
  2. Make sure that medical necessity is the driving factor to determine if low-level or moderate-level care is given.
  3. Ensure that your documentation also supports the level of care that is being billed.

 

Ask us how you can start billing with CPT Codes 99213 and 99214, as well as with other codes today!

 

For more information on other ways to bill and increase your practice’s revenue, check out our articles on CPT Code 96127 and CPT Code 96103:

CPT Code 96127 – Answers to the frequently asked questions about billing this code

3 Online Screenings That Can Be Billed with CPT Code 96127

CPT Code 96127 – How to Increase Revenue with This New Behavioral or Emotional Assessment

CPT Code 96103: How to Increase Revenue and Bill with Psychological Testing

DISCLAIMER: Please keep in mind that Mentegram is a healthcare technology company, and do not consider content on our website as legal advice. It is your responsibility to decide to act on this content, relinquishing Mentegram of all claims. The information that we share is based on what has been effective  for our customers and the best practices as published by authoritative sources.
For specifics regarding your individual practice and specific cases, please consult the particular insurance companies or your office’s billing consultant for additional information.

SOURCES:

http://thehappyhospitalist.blogspot.com/2013/09/99214-CPT-Procedure-Code-Description-Examples-RVU-Distribution.html

https://www.cgsmedicare.com/partb/mr/pdf/99214.pdf

http://bh.medicaid.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Users/008/08/8/Coding-Documentation-for-Behavioral-Health-2016-Zucker.pdf?ver=2016-06-01-182611-063

http://www.mdedge.com/jfponline/article/63368/practice-management/10-billing-coding-tips-boost-your-reimbursement

https://www.cgsmedicare.com/partb/mr/pdf/99213.pdf

http://www.hcca-info.org/Portals/0/PDFs/Resources/Conference_Handouts/Clinical_Practice_Compliance_Conference/2010/Sun/P3_BrembyFriedelPPT-PDF.pdf

https://emuniversity.com/Level3EstablishedOfficePatient.html

http://www.medicarepaymentandreimbursement.com/p/medicare-fee-schedule-for-office-visit.html

 

Welcome to the third part in Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing on trauma. These tools can be beneficial in a number of different ways, but most importantly can assist with keeping patients more engaged throughout the course of their treatments. Clinicians will also appreciate that these instruments can assist in running a more efficient practice, replacing paperwork, saving valuable time and putting in a place a better way to administer screenings and assessments. Another great thing about these online tools is that they can generate additional income, offering an opportunity for additional billing for each patient.

This post will focus on information sheets that are helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from trauma. Mentegram provides an innovative opportunity for mental healthcare providers to make selections from a variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to more detailed, survey-style screenings and assessments. They may then assign these tools to individual patients, with scheduled reminders set by the therapist to provide information or read information sheets that will assist with their therapy

And the really fun part is that these instruments can be conveniently downloaded to each patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, where they can have access from the comfort of their homes, in the waiting room or in any other setting that they choose. Patients will have numerous ways to supply their clinicians with much-needed information, as well as continue to stay better involved with their own courses of treatment.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles (Information Sheet)

This information sheet provides simplified illustrations and detailed examples for ten unhealthy thought patterns. These thinking styles include all or nothing thinking, over-generalising, assigning mental filters, disqualifying the positive, jumping to conclusions, magnification, emotional reasoning, using critical words, labeling and personalisation.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Thought Suppression And Intrusive Thoughts (Information Sheet)

This helpful information sheet thoroughly explains the related issues to thought suppression, explaining that the harder one tries not to think of something, the more it will remain a constant trigger to one’s thoughts. This sheet illustrates this through a simply, easy-to-complete exercise.

DEPRESSION Thought Supression Intriguing Thoughts

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What Is Rumination? (Information Sheet)

Rumination, also known as repetitive thought, is a transdiagnostic maintenance process that offers explanations for a wide variety of mental healthcare conditions. This CBT information sheet explores a myriad of different thinking styles, along with the consequences of such thoughts and their psychological effects.

What Is Rumination

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What If .. ? (Exercise)

This worksheet provides an exercise that assists in exploring multiple scenarios involved with situations and events. It provides the patient the opportunity to visual circumstances in different lights, prompting them to investigate their feelings and emotions in regards to these resulting consequences.

What if

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

And how can these helpful exercises and information sheets assist YOUR patients? That’s easy to find out! Simply try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from trauma, or any other mental health condition. You may explore Mentegram’s entire library of instruments, and begin seeing a higher percentage of patient engagement and better over-all efficiency within YOUR practice!

Plus, Mentegram’s library of online tools can assist with symptoms associated with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Feel free to check out other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

 

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part One

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part Two

 

Welcome once again to the next installment of Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing primarily on trauma. These instruments can be key in leading to mental health providers running more efficient practices, along with generating additional revenue. Replacing paperwork and formatted surveys with online digital tools will even prove to save a lot of time in administration, also providing a systematic way to remotely stay in touch with a patient’s overall needs. To reach these goals, Mentegram offers a variety of online tools, ranging from simple sliding scales to slightly more detailed emotional and behavioral screenings and assessments.

This post will focus on therapy approaches that clinicians may assign to patients who are suffering from trauma. Individually selected for each particular patient, these tools, right at the patient’s fingertips, will assist with their treatment by providing pertinent information to their therapist or physician. And the best part is that these instruments can be easily downloaded to the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, along with scheduled reminders that can be easily set by the therapist. These scheduled instruments will not only provide a convenient way to bridge the gap between office visits, but it will create better patient engagement across the board.

 

What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR)? (Information Sheet)

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is a treatment for processing distressing, traumatic memories and situational circumstances. EMDR can assist in properly storing sensitive memories so that they can be processed in a helpful way. Bilateral stimulation is utilized along with eye movements to enhance memory processing.

What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)? (Information Sheet)

This highly detailed information sheet explains and provides illustrations for trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy. Often differentiating between different types of trauma-based issues can be difficult, so this online tools simplifies this, along with outlining the typical treatment for TF-CBT. It explains the importance of being grounded and stable, along with learning to process memories and understand beliefs.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

DBT Diary Card

The DBT Diary Card is a simple, sliding scale evaluation that provides patients with a way to track their daily emotions. Patients may address feelings of anger, sadness, anxiety and happiness, as well as chronicle situations or circumstances that were difficult to process. It also allows patients to track skills that they are attempting to manage.

DBT Diary Card

 

DBT Diary Card Protocol

The DBT Diary Card Protocol is an online tool that encompasses three instruments, including diary cards to be utilized for daily records, skills used and weekly check-ins.

The Diary Card – Daily Record offers a series of questions, as well as simple “yes” and “no” choices, for better understanding emotions and behaviors. These queries include topics involving self harm, self acceptance, compassion, anger, joy, shame, sadness and fear.

The Diary Card – Skills Used provides multiple choice answers to correspond with questions associated with core mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotional regulation, distress tolerance and other daily skills. Questions may be addressed with scenarios involved with varying degrees of effective skill utilization.

The Diary Card – Weekly Check-in chronicles the patient’s response to their own therapy, and how their feelings and emotions are corresponding to their treatment. Through a series of questions, patients may address their need for consultations, any urges to stop treatment, weekly agendas and the review of weekly notes.

Diary Card - Weekly Check-In

 

By now, you must be really interested to see how these online tools can help YOUR patients with trauma-related conditions, so be sure to try out the instruments. You may also fully explore the variety of instruments that Mentegram has to offer. Why not begin ushering in a higher level of efficiency, as well as better patient engagement into YOUR practice today?

Plus, Mentegram’s library of online tools can assist with symptoms associated with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Feel free to check out other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part One

 

Welcome to the first portion of Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing on trauma. These tools not only can keep patients more engaged throughout the course of their treatments, but they can be key in assisting mental health providers in running more efficient practices, even generating additional revenue. Replacing paperwork with digital tools will even save valuable time in administering screenings and assessments, also providing an opportunity to more thoroughly keep in tune with each patient’s progression and overall needs. To achieve those goals, Mentegram offers providers an innovative opportunity to make selections from a variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to more detailed, survey-style screenings and assessments.

This post will focus on information sheets that are helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from trauma, especially those connected with additional symptoms of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). These instruments may be hand selected by the clinician for each individual patient, assisting with their treatment by utilizing the easy-to-use, beneficial tools right at the patient’s fingertips. And the really cool part is that these instruments can be conveniently downloaded on their smart phones, tablets or computers, with scheduled reminders set by the therapist to provide information and complete surveys or questionnaires to assist with their therapy.

Patients will have numerous aids, capable of documenting their symptoms, thoughts and feelings associated with trauma, along with PTSD. Let’s take a look at a few information sheets, designed specifically for trauma associated with PTSD.

 

PTSD and Memory

This information sheet to assist with trauma and PTSD is also an easy-to-uderstand guide explaining the primary parts of the brain that are typically associated with PTSD. By having a better understanding of the amygdala, hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex, patients may find it less difficult to understand exactly why and how PTSD occurs.

PTSD and Memory

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

This information sheet for symptoms associated with PTSD is presented in the form of a metaphor, focusing primarily on how patients who are suffering from PTSD often find themselves in scenarios where they seem to act out the same situations over and over again in their minds. When a patient suffering from PTSD undergoes treatment, often reliving these memories in a safe, controlled environment can prove to be a very effective form of therapy. This information sheet can assist patients with learning to properly process these memories.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Linen Cupboard Metaphor

This information sheet contains an illustrated metaphor that offers an easy-to-understand explanation of treatments for patients suffering from PTSD. The explanation is extremely simple, showing how patients may “unpack” a problem, and fold it and “repack” it in a way to where it will create less problematic scenarios for the patient. When everything doesn’t go perfectly as planned, this information sheet also shows how to deal with situations that tend to “fall” out of the cupboard.

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Surely you must be interested to see how these information sheets can assist YOUR patients, so act now and try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from PTSD. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, along with welcoming higher efficiency and a better level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Also keep in mind that Mentegram’s library of instruments can assist with the symptoms related to depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Read other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part Two

 

Although it has only been around since January of last year, CPT Code 96127 has been attracting a lot of attention as of late. Some clinicians are just now finding out that CPT Code 96127 may be used to report brief behavioral or emotional assessments for reimbursement. And what does this mean for mental healthcare providers? It means more generated revenue from each patient that walks through the door!

It can be a bit tricky how exactly to bill for CPT Code 96127, and then how and by whom it will be reimbursed. Enough inquiries have arisen that we decided to create a guide answering all of the tough questions that this new billing code has brought to light. Please feel free to check out “How to Increase Revenue with the NEW Behavioral or Emotional Assessment CPT Code 96127”.

However, a lot of clinicians are wondering just what types of screenings and assessments can be billed under CPT Code 96127. It’s also good to know just how these particular tools function, and which disorders they may be used to evaluate.

Mentegram’s library of online instruments is vast and thorough, boasting surveys, sliding scale evaluations, questionnaires, daily journals and information sheets… just to name a few. Let’s take a brief look at the most popular tools that can have you assessing patients who are at risk of mental illness, as well as generating additional revenue, totaling up to $24 per patient for each visit.

Screening Instruments

Mentegram’s library includes an array of questionnaires to assess mental health conditions. Health questionnaires can serve as very informative tools that can provide very unique perspectives regarding the patient’s individual emotional and behavioral needs. By simply responding to a series of prompts, the patient may provide valuable information that will assist the healthcare provider with determining future treatments.

Public-domain instruments in the Mentegram library include PHQ-9, PHQ-A and GAD-7. We also can digitize licensed instruments, such as the DSM-5 screeners, DASS and much, much more.

The PHQ-9 is an excellent example of how screening instrument can be utilized for billing under CPT Code 96127. This instrument offers multiple choice questions that can help in assessing a patient’s reaction or lack of attention toward things in their regular life, such as daily activities, sleep patterns, lack of energy and overall appetite. The information provided may assist clinicians in deciding if treatment for a multitude of conditions is needed.

DEPRESSION PHQ-9

The good news about CPT Code 96127 is that the benefits associated with the use of these tools does not stop at generating revenue through billing. Utilizing these instruments can also:

  • Reduce and even replace paperwork
  • Save valuable time in administration by screening the patients digitally and monitoring their progression
  • Boost patient engagement
  • Create customized reminders for patients
  • Assist in scheduling with a built-in calendar

Also keep in mind that screenings, easily scheduled and even sent to the patient via the Mentegram application, can be administered the day before an office visit. This allows the clinician to have ample time to review the assessments before even seeing the patient.

If you are interested in learning more about the CPT code 96127 and how Mentegram can help you, continue here:

DISCLAIMER: Please keep in mind that Mentegram is a software company, and do not consider content on our website as legal advice. It is your responsibility to decide to act on this content, relinquishing Mentegram of all claims. The information that we share is either what has worked well for our customers or curated content of the best practices from authorities.
We don’t consider ourselves billing consultants and experts. If you aren’t sure, please consult the particular insurance company or billing consultant for additional information.

Welcome to our series describing Mentegram’s online tools for mental health. These instruments will help patients stay much better engaged with their treatments, as well as ensure that therapists can maintain a higher level of efficiency within their own practices. Mental healthcare providers can use these tools to help reduce and even replace paperwork, virtually saving time in administration by screening the patients and monitoring their progression, even in between appointments. To provide these optimal results, Mentegram supplies a library full of tools that range from detailed surveys to simple sliding scales

This post will focus on information sheets that may be assigned to patients suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) by their mental healthcare providers. These instruments may be conveniently accessed on the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer, and therapists may even send reminders to their patients.

A variety of thought-provoking information sheets are available, exploring topics like thinking styles, rumination and suppression. They also provide positive affirmations that will assist with the patient’s symptoms of PTSD, as well as help therapists track a patient’s mental health between sessions.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

This information sheet illustrates a wonderful metaphor, focusing on how patients suffering from PTSD are often forced to replay the same scenarios over and over again in our minds. However, when undergoing treatment, reliving these memories can occur in a safe, controlled environment. This tool can assist patients with processing these memories.

  PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)?

This helpful information sheet describes trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy. It assists patients with differentiating between trauma-based issues and PTSD, as well as outlining the treatment for TF-CBT. It goes over grounding and stabilization, working with memories, working with beliefs and reclaiming one’s life.

What Is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

This illustrated metaphor explains the treatment to patients suffering from PTSD. This brilliant metaphor illustrates how patients may unpack a problem and then repack it in a way that creates less problematic issues for the patient. Problems may spontaneously “fall” out of the cupboard, but this sheet provides solutions for this occurrence.

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD and Memory

This information doubles as guide for understanding the different parts of the brain associated with PTSD. Patients suffering with PTSD may benefit greatly from comprehending the functions of the amygdala, hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex.

PTSD and Memory

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Other information sheets that are available for PTSD include: Thought Suppression and Intrusive Thoughts, Unhelpful Thinking Styles, What Is Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing (EMDR) and What is Rumination.

You must be eager by now to see how these information sheets can assist YOUR patients, so act now and try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from PTSD. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, along with welcoming higher efficiency and a better level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Also keep in mind that Mentegram’s library of instruments can assist with the symptoms related to depression, eating disorders, substance abuse and many other conditions. Read other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

 

Welcome to our series describing Mentegram’s online tools for mental health. These instruments will assist therapists with the overall efficiency of their practices, as well as maintain a high level of engagement for patients. When mental healthcare providers replace paperwork with digital tools, it provides for a better understanding of a patient’s symptoms in between office visits. This also saves valuable time in administration with screening and assessing patients. To regularly achieve these results, Mentegram provides clinicians with a library of tools, ranging from thought-provoking surveys to very simplistic, sliding scale evaluations.

This post will focus on information sheets that mental healthcare providers may assign to patients that are suffering from anxiety. These instruments may be conveniently accessed on the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer.

A myriad of information sheets are available, exploring thought patterns and providing affirmations that will assist therapists with diagnosing and understanding the patient’s symptoms of anxiety, along with the results of these thinking styles.

 

How Breathing Affects Feelings

Screenings provide therapists with information provided by their patients regarding symptoms of anxiety, including being nervous and on edge. Patients can rate these feelings through a simple sliding scale.

As that many patients do not realize the impact that breathing can have on their emotions, this information sheet delves into the explanation of three different types of breathing: normal, exercise and anxious. This analysis culminates with a diaphragmatic breathing technique, instructing patients how to achieve ultimate relaxation that is free from anxiety.

How Breathing Affects Feelings

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

What Is Exposure Therapy

Exposure therapy is one of the most successful forms of treatment for patients suffering from anxiety. This information sheet explores fears and their connections that work as catalysts for patients. With exposure therapy, positive memories are linked to situations that had previously triggered anxious memories, replacing them with feelings of control, achievement and safety.

What Is Exposure Therapy

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles

This helpful information sheets provides illustrations and detailed descriptions for 10 unhelpful patterns of thought. These associations include jumping to conclusions, assigning labels, mental filters and other thoughts.

Unhelpful Thinking Styles

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

What Is Rumination

Rumination, also referred to as repetitive thoughts, is a transdiagnostic process that can be a trigger for or even a result of a diverse array of mental health conditions. Rumination can lead to being constantly preoccupied, dwelling on issues from the past and being consistently caught in a loop of anxious thoughts and reactions. However, there are also positive aspects of rumination, and this information sheet provides patients with examples of repetitive thinking as both a hindrance and a helpful, healthy tool to combat the symptoms of anxiety.

What Is Rumination

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

Are you eager to see how  these online tools could assist YOUR patients?  Act now and  try out the instruments that you may assign to patients suffering from anxiety. Be sure to also keep in mind that our library has instruments that can assist with the symptoms related to depression, eating disorders, substance abuse and many other conditions. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, welcoming better overall efficiency and a higher level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

 

Be sure to check out our additional posts on anxiety!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part One

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part Two

 

Be sure to look for more upcoming posts, as well as read our previous posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Welcome to the next segment of our series focusing on Mentegram’s online tools for mental health. These digital tools will also ensure that patients stay more in tune with their treatments, leading to better patient engagement throughout the courses of their sessions. While saving time in administration with these screenings and assessments, replacing paperwork with these instruments will also give providers an opportunity to better understand each patient’s needs and track their progression. This will ultimately lead to therapists running much more efficient practices. In doing so, Mentegram gives clinicians an opportunity to to choose from a wide variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to in-depth, responsive surveys.

This post will focus primarily on the screenings and basic scales helpful for patients to utilize when assigned by their care providers for anxiety. These digital instruments may be conveniently downloaded to the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer. Scheduled reminders are set by healthcare providers to collect information and prompt their patients to complete surveys or sliding scales. The tools are simple to use, and patients will undoubtedly reap the benefits as they continue to engage outside of their therapy sessions.

Let’s take a look at some of these online instruments!

 

GAD-2 Daily

Screenings provide therapists with information provided by their patients regarding symptoms of anxiety, including being nervous and on edge. Patients can rate these feelings through a simple sliding scale.

ANXIETY GAD 2 Daily

 

GAD-7 Daily

This longer, more detailed screening addresses emotions associated with anxiety, such as trouble relaxing and being restless, easily annoyed or irritated. These emotions may also be gauged and noted via a simplistic scale.

ANXIETY GAD 7 Daily

 

PHQ-4

Patient health questionnaires are unique instruments that will provide clear introspection on the patient’s current emotional status. By responding to a series of prompts, the patient may provide valuable information that will assist the care provider with tracking the patient’s feelings of depression, their sleep patterns, appetite, levels of concentration and lack of energy.

ANXIETY What If

Anxiety (HADS)

Scales offer an excellent form of remote monitoring. Patients may gauge their emotions in reaction to particular situations by simply sliding the scale on this instruments to demonstrate their level of anxiety. These tools cover typical feelings expressed through anxiety, like feeling restless, worried or frightened.

ANXIETY - HADS

These online instruments provide therapists with the ability to track the progression of patients in between visits.  “With alerts and timers to remind patients to utilize these digital tools, this can only continue to build a stronger course of action for patient engagement,” summarized Mentegram’s Chief Medical Officer, Jacob L. Freedman, MD.

If you are excited about how these online tools could work for YOUR patients, jump right in and try out the instruments that may be assigned to your patients for anxiety. Also keep in mind that our library has instruments for depression, PTSD, substance abuse and many other conditions. You are free to explore the vast library of instruments to see how Mentegram can welcome better efficiency and patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on anxiety!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part One

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part Three

 

Be sure to stay tuned for new posts, and check out our previous posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Welcome to Mentegram’s series focusing on our library of online tools for mental health, which assist providers with raising the levels of patient engagement and running more efficient practices. Digital tools help clinicians save time with screenings and assessments, giving them an opportunity to further understand each patient’s progression, as well as cut down on time-consuming paperwork. Mentegram provides the opportunity for mental health care providers to choose from a variety of tools for patients that include everything from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to survey-style, thorough applications.

This is the first in a series of posts that will explain the benefits of journals and thought records that patients suffering from anxiety may utilize. Clinicians may easily select the instruments that will best assist with the symptoms of a patient’s condition, conveniently located on their smart phones, tablets or computers. Scheduled reminders to provide information or complete questionnaires will then be sent to the patient’s device, while they continue to benefit by documenting their symptoms and thoughts associated with anxiety.

Let’s explore a few of these online instruments!

 

Rumination Diary

ANXIETY Rumination Diaries

The Rumination (habits of repetitive thought) Diary utilizes cognitive behavioral therapy to record ruminative thoughts and even images. Patients are also encouraged to include information on what actually triggered these thoughts, as well as the outcome that these thoughts generate. This worksheet can be key in the process of analyzing the repetition of thoughts and how they may affect anxiety.

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

Daily Record of Dysfunctional Thoughts

ANXIETY Daily Record of Dysfunctional Thoughts

Another instrument, the Daily Record of Dysfunctional Thoughts, takes this process a bit further, allowing the patient to attempt to differentiate between “rational” and “irrational” thoughts. Through use of a 5-column thought record, patients may list triggers that may have instigated a particular pattern of thought. This rational emotive behavior therapy can aid especially in encouraging the patient to investigate how they may be further enabling their state of anxiety.

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

 

What If… ?

ANXIETY What If

What If… ? is a worksheet that identifies and questions the situations surrounding “what if…?” scenarios. Through a series of questions, this instrument offers patients the opportunity to vary their negative views of troubling situations through providing positive outcomes only. This way of thinking will drastically reduce the instances in which a patient should experience anxiety during a thought process.

9-Item CBT Thought Record

ANXIETY CBT 9

The CBT Thought Record provides sliding scales and an opportunity for patients to provide information that will assist with analyzing their thought patterns. Illustrating a pattern of “what do you believe and why do you believe it?”, this interactive record logs trigger events and highlights the process associated with automatic thoughts.

All of these instruments arm mental health care providers with a valuable tool with which to track the progression of patients in between visits, as well as ensure that the patients are much more engaged with the progression of their own treatments. Mentegram’s Chief Medical Officer, Jacob L. Freedman, MD., summarized this by saying “With alerts and timers to remind patients to utilize these digital tools, this can only continue to build a stronger course of action for patient engagement. “

If you are excited about how these online tools could work for YOUR patients, jump right in and try out the instruments that may be assigned to your patients for anxiety. Also keep in mind that our library has instruments for depression, PTSD, substance abuse and many other conditions. You are free to explore the vast library of instruments to see how Mentegram can welcome better efficiency and patient engagement into YOUR practice.

 

Be sure to check out our additional posts on anxiety!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part Two

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Anxiety: Part Three

 

Be sure to stay tuned for new posts, and check out our previous posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Welcome to our series focusing on Mentegram’s online tools for mental health. These tools will keep patients engaged in their treatments at a much higher level, and they will even aid mental health providers in running more efficient practices. Replacing paperwork with digital tools gives providers a chance to achieve a better understanding of a patient’s reduction or progression of symptoms, also saving time in administration with screening and assessment. To achieve those goals, Mentegram offers an opportunity to allow clinicians to choose from a library of tools, ranging from contemplative surveys to very simplistic, sliding scale evaluations.

This post will focus on information sheets helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from depression. These  instruments may be conveniently accessed on the patient’s smart phone, tablet or computer and are selected by the care provider to achieve the best positive impacts for the symptoms of depression.

Patients may access a wide variety of information sheets that explore thought-provoking thinking styles and affirmations that will greatly assist with the handling and analysis of emotions falling into the range of depression.

 

Thought Suppression and Intrusive Thoughts

This information sheet gives a simple outline of thought suppression, and the effects of trying to suppress intrusive thoughts.

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

DEPRESSION Thought Supression Intriguing Thoughts

Thoughts and Depression

This information sheet provides an illustration as to why our thoughts directly affect our state of depression.

For more information, visit Psychology Tools.

DEPRESSION Thoughts

Unhelpful Thinking Styles

This information sheet provides details for 10 common cognitive distortions.

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

DEPRESSION Unhelpful Thinking Styles

What is SAD?

This information sheet provides remote monitoring for a type of depression that is related to changes in the seasons.

DEPRESSION What Is SAD

These instruments not only provide the patient with the prompt to further explore their responses, but they give care providers a valuable tool with which to track a patient’s progression in between office visits. By exploring the many instruments available that pertain to depression and its many side effects, patients will continue to engage more and take active roles in their treatment between visits to their care providers.  Summarized best by Mentegram’s Chief Medical Officer, Jacob L. Freedman, MD, he states “With alerts and timers to remind patients to utilize these digital tools, this can only continue to build a stronger course of action for patient engagement”.

So jump right in and try out the digital instruments, adding better efficiency to your practice!

 

Please check out our other posts in this series!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Depression: Part One

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Depression: Part Two

 

Also stay tuned for new posts, and check out our previous posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.