Welcome to the first portion of Mentegram’s series for online tools for mental health, focusing on trauma. These tools not only can keep patients more engaged throughout the course of their treatments, but they can be key in assisting mental health providers in running more efficient practices, even generating additional revenue. Replacing paperwork with digital tools will even save valuable time in administering screenings and assessments, also providing an opportunity to more thoroughly keep in tune with each patient’s progression and overall needs. To achieve those goals, Mentegram offers providers an innovative opportunity to make selections from a variety of tools, ranging from simplistic, sliding scale evaluations to more detailed, survey-style screenings and assessments.

This post will focus on information sheets that are helpful for patients to utilize when suffering from trauma, especially those connected with additional symptoms of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). These instruments may be hand selected by the clinician for each individual patient, assisting with their treatment by utilizing the easy-to-use, beneficial tools right at the patient’s fingertips. And the really cool part is that these instruments can be conveniently downloaded on their smart phones, tablets or computers, with scheduled reminders set by the therapist to provide information and complete surveys or questionnaires to assist with their therapy.

Patients will have numerous aids, capable of documenting their symptoms, thoughts and feelings associated with trauma, along with PTSD. Let’s take a look at a few information sheets, designed specifically for trauma associated with PTSD.

 

PTSD and Memory

This information sheet to assist with trauma and PTSD is also an easy-to-uderstand guide explaining the primary parts of the brain that are typically associated with PTSD. By having a better understanding of the amygdala, hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex, patients may find it less difficult to understand exactly why and how PTSD occurs.

PTSD and Memory

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

This information sheet for symptoms associated with PTSD is presented in the form of a metaphor, focusing primarily on how patients who are suffering from PTSD often find themselves in scenarios where they seem to act out the same situations over and over again in their minds. When a patient suffering from PTSD undergoes treatment, often reliving these memories in a safe, controlled environment can prove to be a very effective form of therapy. This information sheet can assist patients with learning to properly process these memories.

PTSD Film Projection Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

PTSD Linen Cupboard Metaphor

This information sheet contains an illustrated metaphor that offers an easy-to-understand explanation of treatments for patients suffering from PTSD. The explanation is extremely simple, showing how patients may “unpack” a problem, and fold it and “repack” it in a way to where it will create less problematic scenarios for the patient. When everything doesn’t go perfectly as planned, this information sheet also shows how to deal with situations that tend to “fall” out of the cupboard.

Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The Linen Cupboard Metaphor

For more, visit Psychology Tools.

Surely you must be interested to see how these information sheets can assist YOUR patients, so act now and try out the instruments that may be assigned for patients suffering from PTSD. Please feel free to explore the vast library of instruments that Mentegram offers, along with welcoming higher efficiency and a better level of patient engagement into YOUR practice.

Also keep in mind that Mentegram’s library of instruments can assist with the symptoms related to depression, anxiety, substance abuse and numerous other conditions. Read other posts in our series dedicated to Mentegram’s Online Tools by clicking HERE.

Be sure to check out our additional posts on trauma!

Mentegram’s Online Tools For Mental Health – Trauma: Part Two

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply